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Sex with a micropenis can be a mind-bendingly good experience

micropenis

Some say that “size matters” but maybe that’s a load of rubbish after all.

 

Elizabeth McGrath, a San Francisco/Bay Area somatic sex therapist, revealed that sex with a micropenis can actually lead to more pleasure and be beneficial for both parties.

 

Speaking to the Daily Dot, McGrath said that she shifts her clients’ focus away from penetrative sex to other areas of pleasure.

 

McGrath said: “There’s humping, there’s grinding, there’s rubbing the penis on the labia or on the side, and then it expands into ‘What kind of fun things can we do together?’”

 

“Look at it as an opportunity to find new things rather than focus on one way of doing it specifically.”

 

She urged that foreplay and oral sex shouldn’t just be seen as a starter course, but that it can be a fulfilling main event.

 

And there are plenty of ways for increasing pleasure for both parties.

 

She said that toys should be explored, including vibrators, rings or “extenders” over the penis.

 

One of the biggest areas that she works on for boosting pleasure is with reiterating the fact that “normal” doesn’t exist.

As a result, she said that men with micropenis shouldn’t even have to “warn” their partners about their anatomy, as there shouldn’t be any shame attached to those who have one.

 

She said: “If they want to be physical with the person, then the best reaction is, ‘I would like to know how to touch you.’”

 

Ultimately having sex with a person who has a micropenis shouldn’t be a bigger deal than sex with any new partner, as the focus should be on finding ways to make each person feel good.

 

According to the US National Library of Medicine, a micropenis is one that is 2.5 standard deviations below the mean penis length.

 

In male adults, his stretched, flaccid penis must be under 3.6 inches to qualify, according to this study.

 

Having a micropenis is rare, and according to the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, affects around 0.6 percent of the world’s male population.

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