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I Needed Physical Therapy To Fix My “Broken” Vagina

After significantly agonizing sex, one woman took her love life into her own hands. Actually.

My boyfriend asked me to wed him in the middle of the night. He got home from his job as a chef, woke me up, and after that recoiled at my halitosis and asked if I would not mind getting up to brush my teeth. (“Simply a fast swipe! You don’t have to go all out.”) When I came out of the bathroom, he was on one knee– dollar naked– holding the ring up above his hanging balls. This proposition was not going to go viral, however to me it was the most romantic and intimate way to begin a life together. Considered that it was practically 2 in the early morning, we weren’t tempted to share the news with anyone however each other as we lay in bed kissing and whispering excitedly, “We’re getting married!” Here’s the part where any regular couple would go on to have hugely romantic, bed-breaking sex. But we didn’t. Since we couldn’t. Since my vaginal area was broken.

I do not suggest plaster-cast-as-a-chastity-belt broken, but broken as in: my vagina no longer worked the method it was supposed to. The very best way to describe exactly what was taking place is that when we had sex, it seemed like my fiance’s penis had actually morphed from a wizard’s moan-inducing magic wand into a witch’s splintered broomstick. I know, ouch.

At the time of the proposition, I believed I simply had a bad yeast infection. I made a visit with my new gynecologist, whom I ‘d just fulfill once in the past at an uneventful annual check-up. Now, my eyes welled with tears as I sobbed from behind the stirrups, “I simply got engaged and we cannot make love!” She nodded affectionately and informed me I didn’t have a yeast infection. It had to be something else.

Over the next a number of weeks, I was checked for every UTI, STI, and random vaginal area illness under the sun. To both my relief and disappointment, they all came back negative. Sure, it was good to discover out I didn’t have any contagious illness, but considering that I could not make love anyway, it felt like getting a best presence record but terrible grades– what’s the point? My physician ran out ideas and I was shit out of luck.

On the other hand, my fiancé and I began to plan our wedding event. We scheduled our venue, tasted our cake samples, and debated over whether it was appropriate to utilize Van Morrison’s “These Are the Days” as our first dance tune at a Jewish wedding in spite of its thinly-veiled referrals to Jesus. (Answer: Nope!) We perfectly played the roles of two madly-in-love grownups preparing yourself to spend their lives together, but in bed we were uncertain teens stuck on third base.

I started to see my therapist again, who gave me the name of a brand-new gynecologist. My fiancé firmly insisted on accompanying me to the appointment. He carefully stroked my arm as he suspiciously enjoyed the long ultrasound wand vanish inside of me. As much as I was the one feeling the physical discomfort, this had been hard on him too. On the few celebrations I felt up to trying sex, he would gaze into my eyes, not to create a romantic connection, but to look for any sign of discomfort. A worried lip bite or a cocked eyebrow would stop him quickly. He hated that aiming to make me feel great was doing the opposite. I aimed to compensate with exactly what my therapist called, “other things you can do,” (wink, wink blow tasks) however it was no replacement for the connected physical relationship we had prior to my vaginal area ended up being a no-fly zone.

“IT TURNS OUT PHYSICAL THERAPY WAS BASICALLY A COMBINATION OF GETTING BADLY FINGERED AND DOING YOGA.

After a full physical examination that opened my future husband’s eyes to the terrific world of speculums and pap smears, my medical professional identified that based on where the pain was originating from (just inside the vagina), my problem was not hormonal, but in reality, muscular and sent me to physical therapy. Yes, you read that right. I was prescribed physical treatment for my vagina. Not precisely what I ‘d been expecting, but I was enjoyed have a potential service and right away establish an appointment.

I had been to physical therapy for my knees and back in the past, but I had no concept what to anticipate from this. As I prepared to leave for my very first consultation, my fiancé speculated seriously that I would likely be weightlifting Ben Wa balls inside my vaginal area. I dismissed him, but simply in case he was right, I practiced my kegels in the cars and truck en route there.

My therapist was a cute, half-Japanese female about the very same age as I, who in some way found her method into specializing in the art of exactly what is euphemistically referred to as “Women’s Physical Treatment.” Her examination room was painted yellow and a huge painted daisy held on the wall. I valued the uplifting imagery. When she asked me to describe the pain, I break out into tears of aggravation. She generously hugged me and told me I was not the very first with this problem and that it might be repaired. I was happy for the intimacy and convenience level, because 10 minutes later she had actually a lubed and gloved finger up my vag to examine me.

It ends up “Women’s Physical Therapy” is basically a mix of getting terribly fingered and doing a bunch of yoga presents. No Ben Wa balls in sight. Apparently, while my just recently increased core-heavy program of pilates and barre had actually not given me late ’90s Janet Jackson abs, the medical professionals hypothesized that it had actually triggered the muscles in my pelvic wall to tighten. A lot. This would be terrific if I worked as a porn-bot advertising my tight vag, but it’s actually incredibly troublesome for females who wish to have non-cyber intercourse, as the over-tightening in my case equated into a burning experience when disrupted.

Though I was never ever offered any official diagnosis, what I have falls under the big umbrella of “pelvic floor dysfunction.” With a range of signs and treatments, the condition is typically misdiagnosed and maltreated (remember all those blood and urine samples I needed to give?). Still, a study in 2008 found that one out of three ladies in the U.S. suffer from some kind of P.F.D. Since the signs are so diverse, the treatments are also and my physiotherapist has been utilizing an experimentation technique.

About two times a week, I get relaxed both externally by extending the crap out of my hip flexors, and internally by doing some pressure point work. In order to do the pressure point work on my own, my physiotherapist directed had me purchase a $45 device skillfully called The Crystal Wand. In the privacy of my own home, I insert a huge piece of clear plastic (BPA-free, thank you!) up inside myself, and press on my pelvic walls for sixty seconds periods. I have actually likewise bought a spiky yellow ball that I generally sit on during breakfast to alleviate tension in my glutes. (Lest you believe my therapist to be some type of pyramid plan salesperson, I ensure you she did some window shopping to make sure I was getting the best deal on my spiky butt ball and transparent dildo.).

Up until now, there’s just been a bit of improvement, but my fiancé and I have the ability to make love more frequently than previously. He joined me at a session so my therapist might demonstrate the pressure point regimen for him, as an alternative to the Crystal Wand. (Possibly he was feeling a bit threatened?) In the automobile afterwards, he relied on me and stated, “Is it bad that I thought enjoying her do that was a little bit hot?” I gasped in mock scary, but secretly I was grateful. If going through all this hasn’t eliminated his boner for me up until now, then I think we’re going to be okay. As long as I remember to brush my teeth, naturally.

 

source: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/

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